Nothingandall

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Macavity: The Mystery Cat by T. S. Eliot (who was born 120 years ago) Setembro 26, 2008

Filed under: poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 12:59 am
Cat image from here

Macavity’s a Mystery Cat: he’s called the Hidden Paw–
For he’s the master criminal who can defy the Law.
He’s the bafflement of Scotland Yard, the Flying Squad’s despair:
For when they reach the scene of crime–Macavity’s not there!

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no on like Macavity,
He’s broken every human law, he breaks the law of gravity.
His powers of levitation would make a fakir stare,
And when you reach the scene of crime–Macavity’s not there!
You may seek him in the basement, you may look up in the air–
But I tell you once and once again, Macavity’s not there!

Macavity’s a ginger cat, he’s very tall and thin;
You would know him if you saw him, for his eyes are sunken in.
His brow is deeply lined with thought, his head is highly doomed;
His coat is dusty from neglect, his whiskers are uncombed.
He sways his head from side to side, with movements like a snake;
And when you think he’s half asleep, he’s always wide awake.

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like Macavity,
For he’s a fiend in feline shape, a monster of depravity.
You may meet him in a by-street, you may see him in the square–
But when a crime’s discovered, then Macavity’s not there!

He’s outwardly respectable. (They say he cheats at cards.)
And his footprints are not found in any file of Scotland Yard’s.
And when the larder’s looted, or the jewel-case is rifled,
Or when the milk is missing, or another Peke’s been stifled,
Or the greenhouse glass is broken, and the trellis past repair–
Ay, there’s the wonder of the thing! Macavity’s not there!

And when the Foreign Office finds a Treaty’s gone astray,
Or the Admiralty lose some plans and drawings by the way,
There may be a scap of paper in the hall or on the stair–
But it’s useless of investigate–Macavity’s not there!
And when the loss has been disclosed, the Secret Service say:
“It must have been Macavity!”–but he’s a mile away.
You’ll be sure to find him resting, or a-licking of his thumbs,
Or engaged in doing complicated long division sums.

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like Macacity,
There never was a Cat of such deceitfulness and suavity.
He always has an alibit, or one or two to spare:
And whatever time the deed took place–MACAVITY WASN’T THERE!
And they say that all the Cats whose wicked deeds are widely known
(I might mention Mungojerrie, I might mention Griddlebone)
Are nothing more than agents for the Cat who all the time
Just controls their operations: the Napoleon of Crime!

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. 26 September 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, United States – d. 4 January 1965, in London, England)

Read also:
The Boston Evening Transcript
The Naming of Cats

 

Macavity: The Mystery Cat by T. S. Eliot (who was born 120 years ago)

Filed under: poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 12:59 am
Cat image from here

Macavity’s a Mystery Cat: he’s called the Hidden Paw–
For he’s the master criminal who can defy the Law.
He’s the bafflement of Scotland Yard, the Flying Squad’s despair:
For when they reach the scene of crime–Macavity’s not there!

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no on like Macavity,
He’s broken every human law, he breaks the law of gravity.
His powers of levitation would make a fakir stare,
And when you reach the scene of crime–Macavity’s not there!
You may seek him in the basement, you may look up in the air–
But I tell you once and once again, Macavity’s not there!

Macavity’s a ginger cat, he’s very tall and thin;
You would know him if you saw him, for his eyes are sunken in.
His brow is deeply lined with thought, his head is highly doomed;
His coat is dusty from neglect, his whiskers are uncombed.
He sways his head from side to side, with movements like a snake;
And when you think he’s half asleep, he’s always wide awake.

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like Macavity,
For he’s a fiend in feline shape, a monster of depravity.
You may meet him in a by-street, you may see him in the square–
But when a crime’s discovered, then Macavity’s not there!

He’s outwardly respectable. (They say he cheats at cards.)
And his footprints are not found in any file of Scotland Yard’s.
And when the larder’s looted, or the jewel-case is rifled,
Or when the milk is missing, or another Peke’s been stifled,
Or the greenhouse glass is broken, and the trellis past repair–
Ay, there’s the wonder of the thing! Macavity’s not there!

And when the Foreign Office finds a Treaty’s gone astray,
Or the Admiralty lose some plans and drawings by the way,
There may be a scap of paper in the hall or on the stair–
But it’s useless of investigate–Macavity’s not there!
And when the loss has been disclosed, the Secret Service say:
“It must have been Macavity!”–but he’s a mile away.
You’ll be sure to find him resting, or a-licking of his thumbs,
Or engaged in doing complicated long division sums.

Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like Macacity,
There never was a Cat of such deceitfulness and suavity.
He always has an alibit, or one or two to spare:
And whatever time the deed took place–MACAVITY WASN’T THERE!
And they say that all the Cats whose wicked deeds are widely known
(I might mention Mungojerrie, I might mention Griddlebone)
Are nothing more than agents for the Cat who all the time
Just controls their operations: the Napoleon of Crime!

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. 26 September 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, United States – d. 4 January 1965, in London, England)

Read also:
The Boston Evening Transcript
The Naming of Cats

 

The Boston Evening Transcript – T. S. Eliot Janeiro 4, 2008

Filed under: poesia,poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 7:14 am

Boston Evening Transcript, Jul 18, 1914

THE READERS of the Boston Evening Transcript
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn.

When evening quickens faintly in the street,
Wakening the appetites of life in some
And to others bringing the Boston Evening Transcript, 5
I mount the steps and ring the bell, turning
Wearily, as one would turn to nod good-bye to Rochefoucauld,
If the street were time and he at the end of the street,
And I say, “Cousin Harriet, here is the Boston Evening Transcript.

(Em português)

O «BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT»

Os leitores do Boston Evening Transcript
Curvam-se ao vento como seara madura.

Quando a tarde se apressa um pouco na rua
Despertando apetites de vida em alguns
E a outros trazendo o Boston Evening Transcript,
Eu subo as escadas, toco a campainha,
Voltando-me cansado, como que se voltaria para acenar adeus a Rochefoucauld,
Se a rua fosse tempo e ele no fim da rua,
E digo: – Prima Henriqueta, aqui está o Boston Evening Transcript.

Tradução de Jorge de Sena

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. on Sep 26, 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A.; d. Jan 4, 1965)

 

The Boston Evening Transcript – T. S. Eliot

Filed under: poesia,poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 7:14 am

Boston Evening Transcript, Jul 18, 1914

THE READERS of the Boston Evening Transcript
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn.

When evening quickens faintly in the street,
Wakening the appetites of life in some
And to others bringing the Boston Evening Transcript, 5
I mount the steps and ring the bell, turning
Wearily, as one would turn to nod good-bye to Rochefoucauld,
If the street were time and he at the end of the street,
And I say, “Cousin Harriet, here is the Boston Evening Transcript.

(Em português)

O «BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT»

Os leitores do Boston Evening Transcript
Curvam-se ao vento como seara madura.

Quando a tarde se apressa um pouco na rua
Despertando apetites de vida em alguns
E a outros trazendo o Boston Evening Transcript,
Eu subo as escadas, toco a campainha,
Voltando-me cansado, como que se voltaria para acenar adeus a Rochefoucauld,
Se a rua fosse tempo e ele no fim da rua,
E digo: – Prima Henriqueta, aqui está o Boston Evening Transcript.

Tradução de Jorge de Sena

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. on Sep 26, 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A.; d. Jan 4, 1965)

 

The Boston Evening Transcript – T. S. Eliot

Filed under: poesia,poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 7:14 am

Boston Evening Transcript, Jul 18, 1914

THE READERS of the Boston Evening Transcript
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn.

When evening quickens faintly in the street,
Wakening the appetites of life in some
And to others bringing the Boston Evening Transcript, 5
I mount the steps and ring the bell, turning
Wearily, as one would turn to nod good-bye to Rochefoucauld,
If the street were time and he at the end of the street,
And I say, “Cousin Harriet, here is the Boston Evening Transcript.

(Em português)

O «BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT»

Os leitores do Boston Evening Transcript
Curvam-se ao vento como seara madura.

Quando a tarde se apressa um pouco na rua
Despertando apetites de vida em alguns
E a outros trazendo o Boston Evening Transcript,
Eu subo as escadas, toco a campainha,
Voltando-me cansado, como que se voltaria para acenar adeus a Rochefoucauld,
Se a rua fosse tempo e ele no fim da rua,
E digo: – Prima Henriqueta, aqui está o Boston Evening Transcript.

Tradução de Jorge de Sena

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. on Sep 26, 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A.; d. Jan 4, 1965)

 

The Naming of Cats – T. S. Eliot Setembro 26, 2007

Filed under: poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 6:23 am
Picture of a lovely cat (from www.catfacts.org

The naming of cats is a difficult matter,
It isn’t just one of your holiday games;
You may think at first I’m mad as a hatter
When I tell you a cat must have three
different names.

First of all, there’s the name
that the family use daily,
Such as Victor, or Jonathan,
George or Bill Bailey–
All of them sensible everyday names.
There are fancier names
if you think they sound sweeter,
Some for the gentlemen,
some for the dames;
Such as Plato, Admetus,
Electra, Demeter–
But all of them sensible everyday names.

But I tell you,
a cat needs a name that’s particular,
A name that is peculiar, and more dignified,
Else how can he
keep up his tail perpendicular,
Or spread out his whiskers,
or cherish his pride?

Of names of this kind,
I can give you a quorum,
Such as Munkustrap, Quazo or Coripat,
Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellyrum–
Names that never belong
to more than one cat.

But above and beyond
there’s still one name left over,
And that is the name that you will never guess;
The name
that no human research can discover–
But The Cat Himself Knows,
and will never confess.

When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in rapt contemplation
Of the thought, of the thought,
of the thought of his name:
His ineffable effable
Effanineffable
Deep and inscrutable singular Name.

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. on Sep 26, 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A.; d. Jan 4, 1965)

 

The Naming of Cats – T. S. Eliot

Filed under: poetry,T. S. Eliot — looking4good @ 6:23 am
Picture of a lovely cat (from www.catfacts.org

The naming of cats is a difficult matter,
It isn’t just one of your holiday games;
You may think at first I’m mad as a hatter
When I tell you a cat must have three
different names.

First of all, there’s the name
that the family use daily,
Such as Victor, or Jonathan,
George or Bill Bailey–
All of them sensible everyday names.
There are fancier names
if you think they sound sweeter,
Some for the gentlemen,
some for the dames;
Such as Plato, Admetus,
Electra, Demeter–
But all of them sensible everyday names.

But I tell you,
a cat needs a name that’s particular,
A name that is peculiar, and more dignified,
Else how can he
keep up his tail perpendicular,
Or spread out his whiskers,
or cherish his pride?

Of names of this kind,
I can give you a quorum,
Such as Munkustrap, Quazo or Coripat,
Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellyrum–
Names that never belong
to more than one cat.

But above and beyond
there’s still one name left over,
And that is the name that you will never guess;
The name
that no human research can discover–
But The Cat Himself Knows,
and will never confess.

When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in rapt contemplation
Of the thought, of the thought,
of the thought of his name:
His ineffable effable
Effanineffable
Deep and inscrutable singular Name.

Thomas Stearns Eliot (b. on Sep 26, 1888 in St. Louis, Missouri, U. S. A.; d. Jan 4, 1965)